BHS Multicultural Club prepares for annual Multicultural Show

"Culture does not only mean your ethnicity or race. It is what is important to you, and culture is expressed in many ways," says student leader Zamzam Mohamed.

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BHS Multicultural Club prepares for annual Multicultural Show

The previous year's multicultural show performers. (Photo Courtesy of Heba Ghalban.)

The previous year's multicultural show performers. (Photo Courtesy of Heba Ghalban.)

The previous year's multicultural show performers. (Photo Courtesy of Heba Ghalban.)

The previous year's multicultural show performers. (Photo Courtesy of Heba Ghalban.)

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BLAINE HIGH SCHOOL – On Friday, May 26, the Multicultural Club will open up the auditorium doors and let students and staff enjoy the experience of exploring different cultures through its annual Multicultural Show.

Ranad Ghalban, a student leader of the club, describes her experience at the show: “The audience takes a journey into a world that they have not experienced before.”

The club’s main objective in all of its activities is to let members experience and explore one another’s cultures, according to Zamzam Mohamed, one of the club’s student leaders. She says, “Culture does not only mean your ethnicity or race. It is what is important to you, and culture is expressed in many ways.”

However, people have different interpretations as to what “being multicultural” means. Zamzam says, “Some people think that caucasian people and people of European descent can’t contribute to the multicultural club, but it’s the opposite. The club could actually improve if we had more people of European descent, who have different viewpoints.”

Zamzam went on to explain that the club’s meetings and discussions lack their point of view and that they could create a “beneficial conflict” during debates on ethnic, racial and religious issues. She also stated that she would like to see more people of European descent audition for the Multicultural show.

In the future, the club hopes to be able to represent all groups equally in the show and in the club.

In years past, the show has been a journey story of a cultural group and how they came to live in America; for example, the journey stories of the Hmong and African Americans. The show has also taken the shape of a collective storytelling, with a variety of student’s stories.

The stories have taken many forms, from dancing, singing, and poetry, to playing piano and rapping. By doing this, the show has been able to represent many cultures and identities of students, and it has become a harmonious mix of art forms, unified by a theme. This year’s show will have the theme “Rise Up.”

Every year has been different, as it is the student’s contributions and decisions that determine what the show will be. In order to be a part of the show, all people interested must audition. The sign up for auditions is located outside of Mrs. Pohl’s office in the Guidance Office. Auditions will be held Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday (4/10 – 4/12).

Mrs. Pohl, who is organizing and preparing the show, encourages people to audition, but also makes it clear that, “If you are interested in auditioning and participating in the show, know that you must be comfortable being on stage and open to sharing your story.”

Mrs. Pohl says “I am very open to people’s interpretation of what culture is, and every year my goal is to have the show represent a broad variety cultures, identities, and stories from Blaine High School students.” She says that she always tries her hardest to let many people be in the show, as long as their stories are original, they take auditioning seriously, and they are prepared.

Unfortunately, not all of those who audition are able to appear on stage.

Last year, a Sophomore had auditioned for the show with a song that he had written. However, in order for him to perform, he would have had to change the lyrics of his song because they were considered inappropriate for a school environment. That lead him to quit. He was disappointed, and says, “I feel that the show doesn’t allow for people to fully express their emotions.” He adds, “But I understand that the lyrics might have been too controversial to be sung at school.”

Ranad Ghalban gives advice for those who are auditioning: “Be prepared to perform your piece at the audition, to show in what way you may be able to contribute to the show. Remember that it must come from your heart. It is your story that you want to share with the school and with the world.”

Mrs. Pohl urges all students and staff at Blaine High School to come and be entertained at the Multicultural Show. She says, “Come and see the show to develop a better understanding of other cultures.”

 

 

The previous year’s Multicultural Show’s performers. (Photo Courtesy of Heba Ghalban.)

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